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The 4 Best Ruger P89 Accessories, Upgrades & Parts — Reviews 2020 Photo by Andrew Adams / CC BY The Ruger P89 is a classic American firearm. It’s affordable and reliable and was, for a while, everywhere. Is it perfect? No, but that’s okay.

The 4 Best Ruger P89 Accessories, Upgrades & Parts — Reviews 2020 Photo by Andrew Adams / CC BY The Ruger P89 is a classic American firearm. It’s affordable and reliable and was, for a while, everywhere. Is it perfect? No, but that’s okay. You see, the American firearms industry can do a hell of a lot to improve upon everyday handguns, and the P89 is the very definition of an everyday semi-auto pistol. When you start choosing to accessorize your Ruger P89, you need to keep a few things in mind. What does the accessory do for you? Does it improve your performance? Does it make the firearm easier to use? If it doesn’t, is it worth your time and money? Probably not. Focus on what it can do for you. While no accessory can make you a better shot, accessories can make a weapon easier to shoot, more comfortable to carry, and overall a more effective weapon. Below are our recommendations for the best Ruger P89 accessories . Check these parts out! Fobus Standard Paddle Holster Fobus Standard Holster RH Paddle RU1 Ruger P85P/89 Lg. Auto 9mm/.40 cal Price: $24.99 Price as of 08/14/2020 10:38 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. Carrying a Ruger P89 can be quite the challenge. It is a full-sized firearm that has a full-sized weight to it. On the plus side, a full-sized handgun is easier to shoot, more accurate, and often carries a higher capacity of ammunition. Still, the Ruger P89 needs a capable holster, and the "Fobus Standard Paddle" Holster is one such holster. The Fobus Standard uses a standard paddle design that places the paddle behind your pants and is secured by your belt. It can carry the weight of a full sized handgun with its steel reinforced rivet attachments. This holster is capable of carrying both the 9mm and 40 S&W variants of the firearm. Once properly secured to a belt, the holster is capable of carrying the Ruger P89 comfortably throughout the day. The holster uses a passive retention device; this ensures you draw and clean and rapid. The only downside is the lack of active retention device makes it possible for the gun to be taken in a physical fight--but you don’t want anyone that close to you in the first place! The use of polymer materials over standard leather guarantees the holster will never lose shape, flatten, or tear and rip. It’s easy to wash, and not affected by the moisture of gun oil. The use of polymer materials also keeps the holster’s weight at right around 2 ounces. It’s one of the best Ruger P89 accessories on the market. The Fobus Holster Line Watch this video on YouTube

Nordic Components Introduces Revolutionary AR-15 Suppressor Shield Handguard System

Nordic Components Introduces Revolutionary AR-15 Suppressor Shield Handguard System

Nordic Components announces the NCT4, an entirely new handguard system for short-barreled, suppressed AR-15s. This patent-pending design allows users to extend the length of their handguard when using a suppressor. The NCT4 comes in two lengths, with either a 6.7″ or 9.5″ handguard to give maximum coverage on 7.5″ or 10.5/11.5″ barrels. The removable shield provides over 6″ of suppressor coverage and additional rail space.  Both sections are fully M-LOK compatible and feature a seamless continuous top rail.  Suppressor shield mounting is toolless, requiring only the push of a button to unlock the shield. Fully compatible with standard AR15-pattern upper receivers and able to accommodate most suppressors, the NCT4 is the ultimate in protection, modularity, and mission-specificity for the suppressed short-barreled AR rifle. “The current trend is for long handguards on AR-15 rifles, generally out to the end of the barrel. This allows more rail space and better mounting locations for accessories. Short-barreled rifles (SBRs) and AR pistols give up this option. However, Nordic Components set out to add a handguard extension when running SBR/Pistol AR-15s suppressed. The result is the NCT4 Suppressor Shield,” said Casey Knutson, Vice President at Nordic Components. Nordic Components is currently taking pre-orders for summer delivery at NordicComp.com About Nordic Components Headquartered in Waconia, Minnesota, Nordic Components exists to offer professional-grade firearms and components at a reasonable price. They design and manufacture complete rifles, uppers, and components in popular calibers like .22LR, .223/5.56, 300BLK, and .308. They also make industry-leading shotgun extension tubes and other firearm accessories. All Nordic products are Made in the USA.

Pistol Stabilizing Brace Decision Clarified by ATF

Pistol Stabilizing Brace Decision Clarified by ATF

Breaking news from SB Tactical, according to SB tactical they received a letter from the ATF reversing their previous decision on shouldering stabilizing braces of any kind. It wasn’t long ago the ATF flipped the switch and declared shouldering a stabilizing brace a redesign of a weapon, turning it into a short barreled rifle, and making it subject to NFA regulations. This is huge news for those who own or are looking to own a brace. I know for sure I’m buying one for my Mossberg 590 Shockwave firearm. Here is the ATF in their own words. You can read the complete ATF letter for yourself right HERE Courtesy of SB-tactical.com “an NFA firearm has not necessarily been made when the device is not reconfigured for use as a shoulder stock – even if the attached firearm happens to be fired from the shoulder. To the extent that the January 2015 Open Letter implied or has been construed to hold that incidental, sporadic, or situational “use” of an arm-brace (in its original approved configuration) equipped firearm from a firing position at or near the shoulder was sufficient to constitute “redesign,” such interpretations are incorrect and not consistent with ATF’s interpretation of the statute or the manner in which it has historically been enforced.” I gotta give it up to SB Tactical and their endless pursuit of this topic. Stabilizing braces have been quite controversial, and it’s good to see the ATF has seen the light. How long have they seen the light? Who knows, this agency did make shoe strings machine guns once. However, as of now, this is a pretty big deal for those of us who own, or are looking to own Stabilizing braces. All Photos Courtesy of SB Tactical

Dry Fire for Competition Shooters [2019]

Dry Fire for Competition Shooters [2019]

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s The idea of dry firing often sounds boring, but it doesn’t have to be – especially for competitors. Pistol with Loaded Magazine and Dummy Bullets Dry fire is practicing shooting without ammunition .  Because there are no real bullets and no loud noises, it can be done almost anywhere you have a safe direction and backstop available. Most people are familiar with dry fire as a way to work fundamental skills like the trigger press or basic gun-handling like magazine changes.  It’s a great way to practice without needing the time and money for a range trip.  But did you know that there’s so much more you can do in dry fire? Indoor Dry Fire Practice Drill Getting Faster Speed matters in most competition shooting sports.  When tenths of a second can be the difference between first place and second, the faster you can finish a stage with accurate hits, the better you’ll do. Fortunately, live fire isn’t the only way to learn how to get through a stage sooner.  This is especially true because faster split times between shots isn’t the most important part of being faster overall.  That time is mostly gained in gun-handling skills and movement. Both of those can be practiced in dry fire. Unloaded Pistol for Dry Fire For example, drawing a pistol out of a holster quickly and safely is a necessary part of pistol sports like IDPA and USPSA , and it’s also something you’ll need to know how to do for games like 3-Gun . You could just stand in your dry fire space and draw your gun at the wall that is your safe backstop.  Simply adding a target would be an improvement on that.  You can pick up some regular targets ($69 for 100) for your sport of choice, save a few for dry fire, and take the rest to the range for live fire practice days. USPSA Targets If you want to simulate targets that are further away, the best choice is to use reduced-size targets . Nearly identical to the real thing, they let you work at distances that might not be available to you in your house by giving you targets that will look similar to those far away targets when you’re looking through your sights or optic.  They’re also available in all sorts of shapes to look like everything from standard paper targets to different kinds of steel like poppers, plate racks or even Texas stars. Reduced-Size Targets Using an actual target will make your draw more realistic and help you learn how to put your sights where you want them.  By paying close attention to the sights as you press the trigger, you’ll be able to get a pretty good idea of where your shot would have landed if you had real ammunition in your gun. Once you’re able to perform a safe draw, you can add what’s called a par time by using a shot timer, like the Pocket Pro II ($130).  While shot timers normally work by listening for and recording the times when a shot is fired, they also have par time modes where you get not only the usual start beep, but also an end beep after a user-specified amount of time. Competition Electronics Pocket Pro II Shot Timer You can get faster by setting a par time that makes it difficult for you to perform a draw and end up with your sights on target before the second beep.  As you practice that more and more, you’ll find that it gets a little easier.  Soon, you can start slowly decreasing the par time – and if you’re honest in meeting that par and making sure you get and see your sights on target, you’ll get faster when you do it live on the range too. The same principles can be applied to other gun manipulations like reloads, switching between guns for multi-gun matches, and to moving into, out of, and between positions. We go over more of our favorites in Best Shot Timer s. Practicing Dynamic Movement and Positions Dry Fire Drill with Obstacles I just mentioned that dry fire can help you practice getting faster at dealing with different positions, and here are some ideas on positions that you can work on. Shooting boxes.  It’s fairly common in many action shooting sports to see a 3 foot by 3 foot box that you need to stand in, turn around in, or step into before you can engage targets.  Fortunately, it’s easy to build a practice box inexpensively with a few pieces of PVC pipe and some 90-degree elbows.  Larger shooting areas are often made of wood in real matches, and you can substitute with some 1×2 sticks. Barricades.  You might have to shoot around a barricade or through windows or ports at many matches.  While you could build a complete replica at home, it would be pretty heavy and would cost you more than my low-priced alternative.  What I do is simply staple up a few full size targets on a regular target stand.  By stacking them vertically, you get the same effect as having to shoot around a wall, and you can just cut through the cardboard to create ports. A better view of my high/low #port #barricade for #dryfire. Just a couple standard metric #targets stacked on a regular target stand with partial A-zones cut out. . . . #GirlsWhoShoot #GirlsWhoDryFire #GunGirl #GirlsWithGuns #TeamKingShooters #TeamGrayguns #RaceStreetRange #PHLster #BrilliantBackstraps #nuunbassador #nuunlife #SIGSauer #P320 #HardWork #RespectTheCraft #WatchThis #GettingAwesome #TheNRAType #2A #IGMilitia #ThePewPewLife #PewPewPew #USPSA #guns A post shared by Annette Evans (@blastingbeauty) on Sep 13, 2017 at 7:12am PDT Improvised obstacles and props.  It’s not necessary for you to build something special for practicing in dry fire, though.  This is especially true if your sport of choice is precision rifle shooting .  While it’s probably not wise to go sit on the roof of your house or shed to practice shooting off angled surfaces, precision rifle (and 3-gun) match directors in particular are infamous for choosing the most unusual props imaginable to give you “support” for shooting long-range rifle.  Given that, you can look around your house for all sorts of options, because the idea is to practice getting set up on anything that might get thrown at you.  Like a weird rocking chair. Regina Milkovich Attempting a Shot Using a Rocking Chair as a Prop The important thing to remember as you experiment with creating shooting positions and practicing with them is to make sure that you continue to be mindful of the direction your muzzle is pointed and that you keep your finger out of the trigger while moving. Dry fire is a fantastic time to practice those principles so that they are completely ingrained by the time you get to a match. Match-Specific Practice Dry fire isn’t only a place to work on general skills that you might need as a competitive shooter.  It’s also the perfect tool to specifically get ready for your next major match. Often, stage designs are published well in advance of large matches, giving you a general idea of round count, target layouts, props, and the like.  It’s a truism that what’s in the match book will look very different on the ground, but you can still gather useful information from it and use it in your dry fire routine. USPSA Nationals Stages Some of things you might look for include particular target arrays that you can approximate for use in dry fire, unloaded or other unusual starting positions, transitions between different kinds of guns using tables or barrels, low ports, unstable platforms, strong- and weak-hand-only requirements, and the like. Your goal isn’t necessarily to try to duplicate a stage you haven’t seen in real life yet, but to make sure that skills you aren’t already practicing regularly aren’t completely new to you when you show up at the match. Getting Started Snap Caps for Dry Fire Now, then, doesn’t dry fire sound both a bit more exciting and useful?  It’s always been a powerful training tool, but that doesn’t always make it easy to go do it on a regular basis. Snap Caps too boring?  Check out our roundup of the best Laser Cartridge &; Targets . Laser Training Targets See all of them in our new video: Dry-fire too boring too?  Try out a bunch of variations that include movement and more advanced functions with Dry Fire Training Cards. "Dry Fire Training" Cards 17 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 17 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing But now, even with just these few ideas as a starting point, I’m sure you can now come up with all sorts of other things you can do in order to stay interested in dry fire.  Again, if you want the best gadgets…check out "Laser Cartridge &" ; Targets .

Hiding Home Guns in Plain Sight

The idea of packing iron around the house at home every day does not appeal to everyone.  So, what are some alternatives to toting your favorite personal defense gun from room to room all the time?  It may sound problematic to hide multiple guns around the house all day or night, but some other approaches can put defense guns within reach as needed. First of all, if you want a hide gun in every room of the house, then there is nothing wrong with that “overkill” concept as it were, but just be certain that your domicile is secure inside and that everyone residing there knows guns are hidden around the place and where exactly they reside.  Ideally they will be trained in quick response actions as you cannot be home all the time. If you have young children at home or school children in and out, then extra caution is needed to avoid accidents or misuse.  One idea is to place firearms up in higher places not easily accessed by young prowling eyes and fingers. In reverse, if you are retired and at home a lot, then you can pick your own strategies for placing easy to reach firearms so long as you can remember where they are.  That is not as funny as it might seem.  Us older folks often go to the garage, freezer or work room and forget why we are there.  Deal with it. Quick Navigation The Home Scenarios Selecting Home Guns Hiding Home Guns "The Home Scenarios" An investigation of national crime statistics does reveal an increase in home invasions over the past decade especially in certain high crime areas of America.  Think also in terms of such crimes that could just as well impact your bug out location during a SHTF event.  Wherever you reside at any given time is under the same potential threat.  This extends to travel. Whether you stay in a motel, an RV camping area, an interstate highway rest area, a national park, or at any bug out location, the threat potential remains the same. Do You Have Concealed Carry Weapon Insurance? Self-defense can land you into major legal battles, or even jail . USCCA provides top-class CCW insurance plus training for you and your family at $22/mo with $2,000,000 in coverage. Join USCCA So, what is defined as a home invasion?   We typically think of this crime as somebody breaking in our house while we are at work, school, shopping, or just gone.  They steal easy to grab valuables or stuff to hock at a pawn shop or on the street, then are gone in a flash.  Don’t ever discount securing your home against these crimes in the first place by installing extra locks, hardened secure doors, and monitored security systems . Read Also: Handling an Active Shooter Situation Such break ins are one thing, but an invasion implies that somebody is at home at the time and therefore subject to the active threat.  Often these threats can turn violent. Sexual assault, battery, and even death can result from such home invasions.  “Leave no witnesses” is the standard mantra of scummier home invaders. So, there you sit watching television in the den, office, or man cave, your wife is in the kitchen, or sewing room, and the kids are playing on their Wii .  In such a scenario, you have little precious time or none to unlock a safe, open a locked gun closet, or other security practice to grab a gun to defend yourself in order to confront the threat that crashes violently into your house.  Multiple Hornady gun vaults might be an option. What you need is a defensive gun you can grip as you dash from your chair to the breeched entryway.  It has to be conveniently placed and easy to grab virtually without thinking about it.  It is a mindset for sure, that should be practiced. See just how long it takes you to get out of your repose, grab a gun across the room, or in the TV controller console or off the top of a bookcase.  Practice also lying on your bed, as though awakened at night, reading your favorite magazine in the restroom, or other common in home activities.  Become comfortable in your movements, time response, and skills at getting into a defensive mode.  It might stop an invasion and save lives. "Selecting Home Guns" Picking just the right home hiding gun is about as difficult as selecting ice cream at a Baskin-Robbins. There are a lot of flavors to choose from and a whole bunch of them are really good.  This is a decision you have to make for yourself and other family members in terms of what you are comfortable with using, handling, loading, charging, aiming and shooting well especially in tight, pseudo-confined spaces such as down a hallway, or foyer, or room doorway. The best probable choice would likely be a handgun, revolver or pistol in the category of a universal concealed weapon.  That means small, easy to grip, handle, and to hide.  Sure, I like a big Smith .44 Magnum with a 4-inch barrel, but it would not be the ideal handgun for this task.  For this purpose, look at the 9mm or perhaps a .380 ACP with proper specialized defensive ammunition. Related: The Unappreciated 10mm Auto If you like and can handle a 1911 semi-auto in the .45 ACP, then more power (literally) to you.  These are not choices anybody else can make for you.  The same principle stands if your choice, or a secondary hide gun would be a shotgun in 12 or 20 gauge.  Some even might be thinking a defensive rifle such as an AR-15 as a selection, but these could become problematic once a threat is already inside the house. In this discussion, one also has to consider the issue of bullet penetration when shooting inside a dwelling.  There is ammunition available now that is intended for interior defensive use.  The penetration and bullet expansion is controlled so as not to overpower the construction materials of a typical house, therefore not creating a threat to innocents in other parts of the dwelling.  If you question this, practice your ammo choices on some sheetrock, 2×4 lumber, and plywood, so you’ll know its capabilities. Also consider now whether to reply on one gun model with multiples placed in the house, or a one or two gun approach.  Whatever route you choose, make certain every participant in the family is fully versed and practiced with your in home hidden defensive gun(s) defensive plan. "Hiding Home Guns" Where to hide an easy to grab defensive weapon?  Walk the house, tour every room, including the kitchen and bathrooms.  Where do you spend the majority of your time in the house?  Scan each room with the singular goal in mind to identify secure locations to place or hide a firearm.  Maybe among the books in a bookshelf, on a fireplace mantle, down beside the cushion of a couch, next to the television or stereo system. Nearby every entry door, maybe on an umbrella stand, or next to a flower vase on a table.  Perhaps there is a foyer piece of furniture to hide it.  At other entries, maybe hangers mounted above the doors, or a window sill.  They may be placed visible inside, but never allow them to be spotted from the outside. Be creative where you hide home guns, but always with safety in mind.  Propping a shotgun in the corner of a room may be convenient, but not secure.  Place them with care, and practice moving to those locations, and drawing the weapon into a defensive position.  And then hope it never comes to that.  But, if it should, you’ll be ready. Save Save Save Save Other interesting articles: Top 5 Best Gun Safe Under $300 Reviewed: Lock Up Your Survival Guns Prepper Guns on a Budget Pellet Guns, Not Just For Kids Anymore Survival Gear Review: Windham Weaponry Flip-Up Sight

Is the Sierra Tipped Match King the Best Choice for the AR ever?

The Sierra Tipped Match King line has made its way online, and it looks to add a new layer of awesome to shooting the AR15. Many shooters are aware of the previous level of awesome unleashed on the 5.56 ballistics world known as the 77 grain SMK which is famously put together in the Black Hills Mk262 Mod 1 loading. Finally… a projectile was produced that could really get the legs out of the 5.56 while still fitting in the magazine! We all want better ballistics, and Sierra has introduced a more efficient design to both their prior 69 grain and 77 grain SMK offerings. The addition of a ballistic tip to the product line increases the ballistic coefficient of both the 69 and 77 grain loadings and reduces the velocity drop off and increases wind resistance. Below I highlighted the new tipped match kings and compared them to their old counterparts. STMK 69 grain BC: .375 SMK 69 grain BC: .301 STMK 77 grain BC: .420 SMK 77 grain BC: .372 XM193 55 grain BC: .255 As you can see, the new 69 grain loading has a higher BC than the old 77 grain loading, and the tipped 77 grain jumps to a BC of .420! Click to enlarge this hard to see picture : We can see XM193 offers the flattest shooting load out to just past 600 yards, but where it fails is fighting against wind. The 69 Gr STMK appears to be the flattest shooting loading out to 700 yards in this scenario when launched at 2850 FPS with the 77gr STMK right behind it. All trajectories are calculated from 20 inch rifle length barrel velocities, respectively. So how does this benefit you? First and foremost, the wind resistance is strong with these new projectiles.While 55 grain stuff is the flattest shooting inside of 600 yards, it gets bullied by the wind. 90 degree wind at 10 mph @ 400 yards: 77 grain SMK @ 2750 FPS :15.9 inches drift 77 grain STMK @ 2750 FPS: 13.8 inches drift 69 STMK @ 2850 FPS: 14.9 inches drift 55 grain M193 @ 3250 FPS: 20.3 inches drift At the edge of the 5.56s capabilities where we push to 900 yards, there is ten feet less drop from the tipped match kings vs the old match kings. I know what your saying: “Like that matters to me!” You’re right. Precious few of us have access to anything past 300 and those are the lucky ones. I can only shoot to 600 myself… How about a practical scenario? Flight Flub Factor: When Velocity and BC Matter In less pie in the sky fantasy, if we take the 77 STMK and shoot at a 9 inch round target at 450 yards, we have to estimate properly within 36 yards of error. We can mis-estimate that the target is 19 yards closer than it actually is, or 17 yards further out than it actually is and still get a hit from a center hold on target. The faster we push the bullet, and the higher the BC it has, the more forgiving the round is of our error. Compare the above scenario with “normal” 77 grain SMK and the total flub factor is 33 yards where our mis-estimate can still score a hit. Drop the velocity to 2600-2650 FPS from a 14.5 inch carbine with the 77 SMK and you have 27 yards flub. Finally, a 10.5 inch SBR shooting 77 gr SMK with a velocity of 2500 FPS which yields an error window of 25 yards. So… choosing a longer barrel *is* a good thing! 25 yards seems generous, but best practice will be utilized when we choose the projectile with the highest BC available at the highest velocity we can afford to send it. 55 grain stuff is the flattest shooting “defensive” loading that we can get, and it would be a good choice in a world without wind. That said, going forward, I will be ordering 69 grain STMK for my future loadings. It shoots flat, and fights the wind better than what I currently shoot. Sierra looks to have a winner here, and hopefully we can examine some terminal performance gel tests soon. Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print

Summary

The 4 Best Ruger P89 Accessories, Upgrades & Parts — Reviews 2020 Photo by Andrew Adams / CC BY The Ruger P89 is a classic American firearm. It’s affordable and reliable and was, for a while, everywhere. Is it perfect? No, but that’s okay.